High Yield, No Growth Stocks Aren’t Some Terrible Blight Upon Humanity

In 2002, Otter Tail made $1.79 per share in profits on behalf of its owners. For those of you unfamiliar with the company, it is a small, $1 billion-sized northern electric company with 2,300 employees. It has 130,000 costumers, and provides power to half of Minnesota and a little less than half of North Dakota. It has a small footprint in South Dakota as well. The earnings don’t grow all that much, as the company spends about 13% of its revenues on fuel costs alone. Plus, it has an extensive dividend commitment that prevents the company from retaining profits and growing significantly over the long term.

In fact, profits haven’t grown at all … Read the rest of this article!

This Is Not The Right Time To Make A Large Colgate-Palmolive Stock Purchase

Colgate-Palmolive is probably one of my favorite businesses—if someone said I had to make a decision today to only own eight stocks for the rest of my life, and the list could never be changed, it would occupy one of the eight slots (with Nestle, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, General Electric, Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble, and ExxonMobil occupying the others).

You’re already familiar with its product line—Colgate toothpaste, Hill’s petfood, Irish Spring soap—and the fact that the company has been growing dividends for 50+ years (and, like Procter & Gamble, has been paying dividends in uninterrupted quarters dating back to the 1890s). Not only is it a blue-chip with a long history, but … Read the rest of this article!

T. Rowe Price Africa & Middle East Fund: Should You Buy It?

Yum Brands. Diageo. Nestle. Wal-Mart. Coca-Cola. If you ever develop the urge to invest in Africa, look to buy stock in those five companies which are currently investing throughout the continent to mixed results, although Nestle is once again proving that it has the business model to make money anywhere.

I was reading through the T. Rowe Price Africa & Middle East Fund (ticker symbol TRAMX), and I was reminded of the statistic that there has never been an African-focused fund open to American retail investors that has beaten the S&P 500 because it is extraordinarily difficult to successfully predict African firms that would serve as suitable long-term investments.

Since its inception in … Read the rest of this article!

Warren Buffett Continues To Sell, Sell, Sell Procter & Gamble

Warren Buffett’s largest stock holdings at Berkshire Hathaway might change more often than you think they do. If you pull up an annual report of Berkshire from 2005, you will see the largest stock investments listed as follows: American Express, Ameriprise Financial, Anheuser-Busch, Coca-Cola, M&T Bank Corporation, Moody’s, Petrochina “H Shares”, Procter & Gamble, Wal-Mart, The Washington Post Company, Wells Fargo & Company, and White Mountain Insurance.

By the time 2013 came around, the reported list of stock holdings contained some familiar faces, but some changes as well: American Express, Coca-Cola, DirecTV, Exxon-Mobil, Goldman Sachs, IBM, Moody’s, Munich Re, Phillips 66, Procter & Gamble, … Read the rest of this article!

A Very Lucrative Investment Over The Next Fifteen Years

The past decade has been a godsend for income investors that have owned McDonald’s stock because the profits have grown by 14.5% annually and the dividend has grown by 25.5% annually. Those $0.55 annual dividends in 2004 became $3.40 dividends in 2014. You were to able capture two things that were happening simultaneously over the past ten years while you held McDonald’s stock: (1) profits continued to grow, and (2) the payout ratio continued to grow as McDonald’s went from paying 28% of its profits as dividends to paying out 58% of its profits as dividends.

Such opportunities are hard to find ahead of time, but they can be lucrative additions to … Read the rest of this article!