Some Retirement Advice Is Terrible, Short-Term, and Treats You Like A Yo-Yo

If you received the September 7th copy of The Wall Street Journal, you would have encountered Jason Zweig’s article on the bottom of the first page titled: “Trading Your 401(k) Account: How Bright Can It Be?”

The article discusses the rise of services that encourage you to think short-term within the confines of your 401(k) account, offering advice that is designed to shift strategies every month. Here are the money quotes form Zweig’s article:

“Your 401(k) retirement plan is supposed to be the ultimate long-term holding, with a horizon that for many investors extends for decades. Even so, advisory services are springing up to help you manage your 401(k) over the short

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Three Ways To Ruin Your Financial Life

One of the most powerful ways to think that I picked up from Charlie Munger was this: reverse engineer everything. There are generally two ways to do this: first, you determine the outcome you want, and then you break down the steps in reverse order that would be necessary to get you there—and voila!—you suddenly have a blueprint to fulfill a particular dream.

The other approach involves finding happiness by avoiding misery. This means that you identify the life outcomes that you want to avoid, and then you draw up a path that would lead to those undesirable outcomes, so that you can catch yourself if you find yourself drifting in that direction.… Read the rest of this article!

How To Save The Newspaper Industry

Somewhere in the basement at my parent’s house, there is a collection of newspapers that marked off important historical events from our family’s worldview. Copies of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on the day that the US won the “Miracle on Ice” hockey game, anytime the St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series, Princess Diana’s death, 9/11, the commencement of war in Iraq, the death of Stan Musial—stuff like that. When I was in town this summer, I remember looking at the papers from a decade ago and thinking one thing—newspapers are total shells of their selves, even counting the not-too-distant past.

That is because, in an attempt to stem the losses from the … Read the rest of this article!

Stocks Get Cheap on Christmas Eve

The typical United States stock lost approximately 20% of its value in December 2018. Technically, we have to go back to the Great Depression to find another example of a December in which stock prices have declined by such a substantial amount, but on an annual basis, we are looking at a 10% or so decline, which is something that U.S. Stocks have done about 4-5 times out of every 20 years since the Civil War.

I wasn’t planning on writing about investments during the heart of the Christmas season, but I am reminded of a client I once represented at trial who had to call and make arrangements for neighbors to take … Read the rest of this article!

How To Solve 10% Of Life’s Problems


I was recently reading this article on the effectiveness of D.A.R.E. programs nationwide (for those of you not aware, D.A.R.E. stands for “Drug Abuse Resistance Education” and is a nationally run program that involves local police officers stopping by the classroom to educate middle-school kids about the dangers of substance abuse).

The objective of the program seems harmless enough—after all, who could possibly be against drug prevention?—I’m not exactly going out on a limb by saying that most parents would rather see their kids grow up to deal in blocks of Coke stock purchased through a broker on The Street rather than keys of coke purchased from a guy on the streets.  Yet … Read the rest of this article!