Bruce Springsteen Released “Born To Run” 38 Years Ago Today

On August 25th, 1975, Bruce Springsteen released the album that forever changed his life, Born To Run.  It is an eight track masterpiece that finally proved The Boss worthy of the lavish praise the New Jersey music scene had been heaping upon him.

The eight tracks go as follows (links are taken from the 1975 performance at The Hammersmith Odeon, which along with the 1978 show at The Winterland and his 1980 show in Los Angeles, mark the Boss’s greatest live performances).

#1. Thunder Road.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tx71aA62Hx4

#2. Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAvolRT3sX4

#3. Night. Did Not Perform As Part of Set List.

#4. Backstreets.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqZPGT0TsZ8

#5. Born To Run.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqTLl68aUzg

#6. She’s The One.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9jcvBYhJEE

#7. Meeting Across The River. Did Not Perform As Part of Set List.

#8. Jungleland.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aRhqVWUPPs

If listening to that doesn’t put you in a good mood, I’ve got nothing for ya.

As Greil Marcus said in his October 1975 review of the album for Rolling Stone Magazine: “It is a magnificient album that pays off on every bet ever placed on him—a ’57 Chevy running on melted down Crystals records that shuts down every claim that has been made. And it should crack his future wide open.”

That’s when you know you’ve done something great in life: when you can produce something that pays off on every bet ever placed on you. Reaching our life’s potential often requires substantial financial resources in order to do so. If you want to restore a dilapidated church, you need to have the bank account balance necessary to be able to write out a $300,000 check to cover the cost of the repairs.

If you want to bankroll a legal case to fight eminent domain in your community, you need to be able to write a big check to bring in the best legal talent available. If you want to run a business empire, you need that first couple hundred thousand dollars to get a business under a belt to provide the cash streams that can fund your future endeavors. Most of us have ideas on our head (some of which we share with others, and some of which we keep private) of what it would take to lead a satisfying life and to leave the world behind in a better place than when we first encountered it. Heck, Springsteen couldn’t have released Born To Run if his mom wasn’t willing to put up a month’s salary to buy him a guitar in his early teen years. It sucks having dreams we can’t act upon—and that is why it is important to create a sizable gap between what we earn and what we spend, because it is from that surplus that we can build something that will give us the capital to make the kind of changes in the world that we dream about.
 

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7 thoughts on “Bruce Springsteen Released “Born To Run” 38 Years Ago Today

  1. scott says:

    IMHO BS peaked at the Main Point, Bryn Mawr PA on February 5, 1975. He previewed half the BTR Lp in radically different versions. As you're a fan of the LP I'd suggest this show is well worth a listen. Also the version of I Want You may be my fave cover ever of a Dylan track. Even more than any of Jimi's estimable efforts.

    I was fortunate to have attended one of the Bottom Line shows (the 9th one, to be specific) Great as I remember it being when I heard tapes of this broadcast years later it immediately became my benchmark Bruce performance. BTW there are some fantastic live versions of "Night" from the 1976 tour.

    Oh yeah, super blog, keep 'em coming, not that I have any doubt that this will continue to be the case…

    As an aside, an article / post on the concept of de-worsification (sp?) might prove to be an exhilarating topic.

    1. Tim McAleenan says:

      Loved Springsteen's version of "I Want You." Such a different interpretation than what Dylan did with it. The Bottom Line show is one of the tighest set lists from the Boss I've ever seen. Incident, I Want You, Spirit In The Night, Kitty's Back, Rosie, Sandy, and For You all within a two hour stretch? Good Lord.

      I always regarded this performance on August 20th, 1981 as Bruce's best:

      The rationale: The cover of Who'll Stop The Rain is chillingly good, the intro to Trapped is one of my favorite heartfelt intros he ever did, the Jole Blone-Wreck On The Highway-Racing In The Street is one of my favorite three song stretches he ever did, and he ends the show by playing "The Ballad of Easy Rider" (the only time in his life he ever covered that Byrds' song), and then you get BTR, Detroit Medley, and Twist & Shout to close out the night. It's a 1978 Backstreets short of perfection.

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  4. Dude, I saw the Boss for the first time live in November 2012 in St. Paul. Quite possibly the best show I have ever seen. I've seen Dylan, Fleetwood Mac, John Mellencamp, and others. Springsteen rocked it for almost 3 1/2 hours. Unbelievable. The E Street Band was on fire. I'll never forget that show.

    Check out the remastered re-release of the Hammersmith CD. Has a few more tracks, including (in my opinion) the best-ever version of Rosalita.

    So happy in 2012 to sing along to Rosalita, Hungry Heart, Atlantic City, Born to Run, Tenth Avenue Freezeout, Darlington County, and others.

    BTW, the Hammersmith version of Born to Run and Tenth Avenue are my favorite versions, as well.

    The Dividend Warrior

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